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Daughter, Daedalus

Alison D. Moncrief Bromage

$9.99$12.60

Winner of the 2016 T. S. Eliot Prize for Poetry Available Now

Daughter, Daedalus is a siren song composed of loss and beauty. Moncrief Bromage uses detailed themes of mothering and barrenness so wonderfully interwoven that readers will feel the pain and want as seeming simultaneously just out of reach and attached to the soul.

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Winner of the 2016 T. S. Eliot Prize for Poetry

Daughter, Daedalus is a siren song composed of loss and beauty. Moncrief Bromage uses detailed themes of mothering and barrenness so wonderfully interwoven that readers will feel the pain and want as seeming simultaneously just out of reach and attached to the soul. In her collection of apostrophes and open letters to the mythic inventor Daedalus and her daughter, Moncrief Bromage hauntingly presents intersections between the natural laws of the physical world and the powers of mystery, creation, and myth.

Daughter, Daedalus is both original and very often masterful. From the very first poem, the reader is taken in by language and inventiveness. There is also an elevated High Church intention—a scent of incense and bells chiming—that T. S. Eliot would have recognized.

–Jennifer Clement, 2016 judge, T. S. Eliot Prize for Poetry

There is an Anglo-Saxon vitality to her language that moves us steadily into the still center of life and the overwhelming power of poetry itself. In Daughter, Daedalus the declension “between child, god and me” transmutes myth into an essential self portrait, without egoism, rising high on the wings of redemptions.

—Ishion Hutchinson, author of House of Lords and Commons

Daughter, Daedalus affirms what the imagination is for—to bring to the center who we are, to help us regain footing as we lose hope—proposing that “there are many ways to outfox our living.” With poems that pull away from our time, but only enough to lay bare what it means to want, Alison Moncrief Bromage renders a world where “days have another clock master,” where “we grow by pulling to stand // against a spinning ground.” Here are poems equal part love letter and cast spell, myth and unit of measure, circle and feather and whale, their diction charged and ringing with old sounds, fairly begging for the world to make sense. Whether reckoning with a lost twin, a long-awaited daughter, a love across time, here is work unafraid of what’s been lost, or gained. I’m haunted by this striking, original debut.

—Kerrin McCadden, author of Landscape with Plywood Silhouettes

Daughter, Daedalus is an especially recommended addition to community and academic library Contemporary American Poetry collections.  ‘Daughter; The cold will come’: The cold will come to deliver you / as a body surrounded by another. / If you must take hold of me here, / I will meet you / north as we are. / There are no islands in winter.

—Midwest Book Review, Poetry Shelf

Contents

Acknowledgments
In the Beginning
Daedalus
In the Pen
The Dancing Place
Datum
Alibi
Artificer
A Simple Machine of Efficiency and Suspense
About Silence
We Come and Go in Ships
The Remains of Something
What Space You Stake O Barrenness
Firsts Born
When Winter Comes Up
At the Place Where Hope Is a Vestigial but Torn Muscle
In Image
We Await You like Passing an Eyeball Between Us
The Great Inventor Made the Sail
In My Dreams
Father of Invention
Daughter
Daughter, Daedalus will make for you
Daughter, I think of you as a tender
Daughter, Your home will be
Daughter, At the edge of the yard
Daughter, You will sleep on a sheepskin
Daughter, A sliver of copper
Daughter, I will not remember when
Daughter, Of the family line
Daughter, The butchers will slaughter
Daughter, I will show you the rain
Daughter, The potatoes sprout eyes
Daughter, Twin Suns
Daughter, The cold will come
Daughter, Where we come from
Limbo
Day One
Day Four
Day
Day, I lost a few
Day Six
Day Six
Day Seven
Crossing
Nesting
Gravity
Daughter, The Prologue
Prologue
Fever Shed
Twin A
Twin B, or Teratoma

Authors

Alison D. Moncrief Bromage's poems have appeared in The Paris ReviewDenver QuarterlyBarrow Street, and elsewhere. She holds an MFA from New York University.  She is now a writing tutor at Yale University and lives in Stony Creek, Connecticut, with her husband and children.

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