The Naked Scarecrow

Richard Moore

$15.00

Richard Moore’s tenth published collection of poems offers insights into twentieth-century American life. Moore’s poems are in rhythms and discernible forms, witty, moving, and above all, understandable.

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Paperback

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Description

The Naked Scarecrow, Richard Moore’s tenth published collection of poems, offers insights into twentieth-century American life. Moore’s poems are in rhythms and discernible forms, witty, moving, and above all, understandable.

Moore first acquaints us with the absurdities, agonies, and paradoxes of being a husband and father in contemporary America. He then expands his view into society as a whole. In the final sequence, Moore brings the self and its naked helplessness into mystical contact with the world.

Contents

Aknowledgments

The Naked Scarecrow

withered into art
The Defense
Man, Boy, Birds
Golfballs
Depths
Cat’s Castle
Variations on a Dog
Back Then
The Visitors
Marriage Blues
The Tennis Ball
Nightfall
Epilogue

the giant redwood
Ancestral Memories
Spring 1968
Poem about Vietnam That Didn’t Suit Anybody at the Time
On the Municipal Golf Course
The Little Man Speaks
In Memory of One of the Better Ones
For My Country in Its Finest Hour
The Cycles of Things 3
Caesar
The Creation

seeming to live
Waiters
Apology
Report Card
Volumnia’s Offspring
Haunted
The Time
April Is the Cruelest Month
The Passionate Shepherd’s Return

the veil
Continuity
Nowhere
In Future Time
Premonition
The New Order
After the Ice
The Veil
The Playground
Survivors
The Old Men
The Stream

Authors

Richard Moore’s published works include a novel, a book of literary criticism, and nine other books of poetry, one of which was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize. His fiction, essays, and poems have been published in magazines such as The New Yorker, Atlantic, Harper’s, Poetry, The American Poetry Review, and The Nation.

Reviews

The Naked Scarecrow gives us Moore at the height of his ability…even a first reading instills a sense of continuity, of wholeness, that other poets rarely attempt and almost never achieve.

—Richard Wakefield, Light

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