The New World Merchants of Rouen, 1559–1630

Gayle Brunelle

$40.00

This book is the study of 144 merchants in Rouen who invested in trade or shipping to the Americas in the sixty years before Cardinal Richelieu began to regulate their activities for the benefit of church and state. (SCE&S 16)

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Hardcover

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Description

Sixteenth Century Essays & Studies, Vol. 16

This book is the study of 144 merchants in Rouen who invested in trade or shipping to the Americas in the sixty years before Cardinal Richelieu began to regulate their activities for the benefit of church and state. Rouen, during the time studied in this book, was the largest French seaport and in direct connection and competition with various Dutch and English ports. The author focuses on the French merchants and their investments and how their economic fortunes affected their rise and fall in French society.  

Contents

List of Illustrations

List of Tables

Acknowledgements

Introduction

Growth of Rouennais Economy and Commercial Network in the Sixteenth and Early Seventeenth Centuries

Expansion and Exploration: The Growth of French Commerce and Colonization in the New World, 1500 to 1630

The Ties that Bind: Investors within the Rouennais Community

Principal and Profit: Land, Loans, and Economic Security

Privilege and Profit: Strategies of Social Mobility among Investors in Commerce with the New World

The Limits of Tolerance: Religious Polarization among Investors

Conclusion

Bibliography

Index

Authors

Gayle K. Brunelle is a graduate of Saint Michael's College in Winooski, Vermont. Her M.A. and Ph.D. were earned at Emory University. She has received research grants from the Social Science Research Council, National Endowment for the Humanities, and the American Philosophical Society. She has published in various places including The Sixteenth Century Journal. She is a member of the history department of California State University, Fullerton.

Reviews

This carefully researched study provides a rare look at the economic activity of a group of shipping merchants outside their New World commercial network. [Brunelle’s] account gives explicit family data on these merchants’ “struggle to ascent the social ladder,” a welcome addition to most studies of Atlantic merchants in the old regime.

Perry Viles, American Historical Review

Brunelle critically examines the supposed incompatibility between commerce and office holding, with all it implies about the dynamics of social change in early modern France.

—Michael Wolfe, The Historian

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